Chevrolet GoGo Link marries cellphone navigation and dashboard LCD for $50!

Chevrolet GogoLink

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Chevrolet GoGo Link represents the beginning of the end for overpriced embedded car navigation systems. This $50 option lets you replicate your smartphone’s navigation display on the center stack LCD display of sub-$20,000 Chevys starting this fall. It works initially with iPhones and Android phones. You have to have the Chevrolet MyLink touchscreen LCD and infotainment option plus the GoGo Link option. And a smartphone, which you probably have lying around.

GoGo Link projects the GoGo smartphone navigation app onto the car’s color LCD touchscreen. Drivers can control the nav system with the touchscreen. Voice instructions play through the car speakers. It’s on the entry Chevrolet Spark and compact Chevrolet Sonic. You can’t use just any app: You have to use the GoGo navigation app on your phone.

Chevrolet says it did extensive focus group testing before bringing the GoGo Link offering to market. Actually, Chevy managers could have done a quick happy hour session at TGI Fridays and gotten the same result asking three questions over the first round of drinks: “Will anybody in their right mind spend $1,500 for navigation in a $15,000 car when they’ve got navigation on their smartphones?” (No.) “What about if we, say, dropped the price to $795 for embedded SD card navigation?” (Probably not.) “What about if we sold a $50 smartphone connection that opens up access to the touchscreen?” (Where do I sign up?)

Chevrolet GogoLink screenChevrolet says it hasn’t yet determined if it’ll expand GoGo Link to other Chevrolet and GM vehicles. Translation: They haven’t determined how soon they’ll have to offer GoGo Link on $20,000, $25,000, then $30,000 vehicles. The die has been cast. GoGo Link has the potential to drive customers to GM as Sync did for Ford starting in 2008: When you’ve got an iPod or other smartphone with music and navigation, why should you pay the automaker for a dated, unlikely-to-be-updated CD player or navigation system?

South Korea’s EnGIS Technologies supplies the GoGo Link software.

We test-drove the Chevrolet Sonic a year ago and called Chevrolet “clueless on tech” because the essentials of a modern car — Bluetooth, USB jack — weren’t offered on the entry model and came standard only on the costliest Sonic trim line. Navigation couldn’t be had at any price. GoGo Link helps fill in some of the blanks from a year ago. It’s unclear what the actual cost is because you must have MyLink — the touchscreen LCD display — and to get MyLink you have to jump to a higher trim level with a cost more than $2,000 higher the one just below. Chevrolet isn’t saying how much of that is associated with MyLink. (The two lowest Sonic trim lines are supposed to offer MyLink as a standalone option but GM hasn’t yet shown pricing or the option on its site.)

Others are trying to bring smartphone navigation connections to the car dashboard as well. Sony just announced replacement MirrorLink radios. They only work with the handful of cars and SUVs that have replaceable radios with double DIN (7×4 inches) slots in the center stack. Sony uses compatibility software promoted by the Car Connectivity Consortium.

courtesy of extremetech.com

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Hey there fans! Don’t miss out on this exclusive offer to take home a brand new 2013 Cadillac XTS today!

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Also, click on over to our website and check out all the other great specials we have going on! http://bit.ly/N2UxW5

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Jordan Taylor joins Team Cadillac drivers Andy Pilgrim and Johnny O’Connell as they prepare to take on the Cadillac Mid-Ohio Grand Prix.

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2013 Chevy Camaro ZL1 Convertible and SS 1LE edition: Motoramic Drives

Last Sunday in the pleasant downtown of Grand Rapids, Mich., a woman accosted me across two lanes of traffic, shouting through her open minivan window “That’s what I’m talking about!” What she was talking about was this, the 2013 Chevy Camaro ZL1 convertible, a combination of 580-hp raging road machine, boulevard cruiser and conversation starter that only a handful of buyers will ever put their hands on.

 

Convertible pony cars have an appeal that transcends their hardtop brethren, offering a way to experience summer that no other vehicle quite matches. Yet for much of the Camaro’s history, General Motors either didn’t sell a convertible or avoided putting its most brutal engines in the drop-top editions, because cutting a hole in a car can turn its chassis into a Bop It game. In the previous generation Camaro, the convertible combined with the LS1 offered good straight-line speed and cowl shake — that sense going over bumps that the steering wheel and your seat are connected to different cars.

With the new generation, Chevy’s engineers have vowed to match the Ford Mustang punch-for-punch, which means building a convertible version of its most powerful factory edition. Since it was in the plans when the engineers began designing the new models, the ZL1 convertible comes with more positive reinforcement than Donald Trump in a hall of mirrors. There’s extra braces between the engine mounts, around the transmissions, in the windshield pillars and several other places, all meant to make the ZL1 convertible lose little in handing to the ZL1 coupe.

The resulting car glides like a well-trained monster. Around town and on freeways, the ZL1 convertible is perfectly civilized, it’s supercharged 6.2-liter V-8 burbling along at one-tenth power. Decide to throw the hammer, and within a split second the ZL1 has thrown you forward as high as the law and your right foot allow. The convertible offers the best way to hear the engine in full melodious roar, and the combination of magnetic-ride shocks, Goodyear Supercar tires and the heap o’bracing keep the ZL1 properly tight around corners and over Michigan’s imperfect roads. Even the new electric power steering, typically a fun-killer, works to make the ZL1 seem less hefty than its curb weight — unspecified, but likely well north of 4,000 lbs. — would suggest.

It’s impossible to not feel more alive when driving a ZL1 convertible, which helps combat its biggest problem: the sticker shock of a $62,000 price tag. The Camaro has always been about affordable performance, about letting its owners outperform more expensive cars, but with the ZL1 convertible, the Camaro’s knocking on the country club’s door with its ponytail hidden under a new ballcap. GM engineers know what they’ve done, and set production estimates accordingly; there will be only a couple thousand ZL1 drop-tops sold at best every year.

But those same engineers make another argument: Compared to other top-flight convertibles — the BMW M6, the Mercedes-Benz SL63 AMG, even the Porsche 911 — the Camaro offers more power and comparable handling for up to $40,000 less. There will be no mistaking which cars cost less; in top-dollar form, the Camaro’s interior offers at least 10 kinds of plastic and fabric that look like a nervous kid overdressing for his prom date.

Yet GM has a better answer for where those savings could go: the Camaro SS with the 1LE track package, a new combination of parts aimed at the Ford Mustang Boss 302 Laguna Seca and all those who want a track car they can still drive to work. Starting with the regular SS, Chevy has grafted the ZL1’s Goodyears, lighter wheels, tighter final drive ratio and tougher suspension settings into a 426-hp car that can generate more than 1g of acceleration side-to-side. (The black vinyl-wrapped hood is just for kicks.) At the GingerMan track in Michigan, my attempts at unsticking the 1LE failed time and again; you can run to more than 100 mph quickly, haul it down with fade-free brakes and then throw it around corners with a general lack of body roll or understeer.

There’s not been a head-to-head test yet of the 1LE versus the Boss 302, but at $37,000 and change, the 1LE undercuts the more expensive ‘Stang by a few thousand, and For the price of a traditional European convertible, you can get both the ZL1 convertible and a 1LE as a track toy. A few years ago, suggesting you could buy two Camaros with your MegaMillions winnings would have seemed off-kilter. It’s a credit to Chevy engineers that the same idea in 2012 comes off as almost reasonable.

courtesy of autos.yahoo.com

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Happy Friday, everyone! What did you think about the United States gymnastics team?

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They did excellent in representing their country!

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Watch as a professional driver takes the all-new Chevy Malibu Turbo LTZ for a ride around the track!

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Hello fans, we are halfway through this week! Read how “Cadillac Is Planning A Larger Crossover Model”!

There’s plenty on the way from Cadillac, including a new flagship model based on its Omega platform, but the American automaker is also working on a large crossover model using an upgraded version of its Lambda platform.

 

GM plans to have a large crossover for its Cadillac brand on the market as a 2015 model year, and will utilize the same platform that the current Buick Enclave, Chevrolet Traverse, and GMC Acadia are using. Currently, the American automaker has its SRX (pictured above) offering, and the much larger Escalade, so the luxury brand could definitely use a three-row crossover to fill in the gap and compete against models like the new Infiniti JX.

The SRX, on the other hand, gets restyled for the 2013 model year, going on sale this fall sporting the Cadillac User Experience (CUE), interior improvements, a new grille, front fender vents, and LED headlights. A redesigned SRX could also be heading to dealerships in late 2014 or early 2015, and a plug-in hybrid model is a possibility.

courtesy of autoguide.com

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